• “The uninsured have a higher risk of death when compared to the privately insured, even after taking into account socioeconomics, health behaviors, and baseline health,” said lead author Andrew Wilper, M.D., who currently (as of 2009) teaches at the University of Washington School of Medicine. “We doctors have many new ways to prevent deaths from hypertension, diabetes, and heart disease — but only if patients can get into our offices and afford their medications.” http://obamacarefacts.com/facts-on-deaths-due-to-lack-of-health-insurance-in-us/

• Life expectancy is shorter in the United States despite some relatively healthy life style practices. Americans, for example, drink less, are less likely to commit suicide, and are much less likely to smoke than residents of other OECD countries.   Americans, however, use the health care system less than do residents of other countries. They average only 4.1 physician consultations per person per year, compared to 6.7 for the rest of the OECD, and Americans have fewer and shorter hospital stays.—Economic Analysis of the New York Health Act.

•  Like other basic services such as education, police, fire protection, and roads, paying for health care should be a public responsibility. We should not be at the mercy of insurance companies and their ever-increasing premiums. Health care should be a basic right, not a privilege or a commodity. – Assemblyman Richard Gottfried, Single Payer Health Plan for New York.

• A 2016 study by WalletHub rated New York’s healthcare system the 35th best when comparing healthcare costs, access and outcomes across the fifty states and the District of Columbia.